Stanford University
Center for Innovation in
Global Health  

Global Health Undergraduate Courses

Anthropological Sciences

Anthsci 82, 282. Medical Anthropology

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.

5 units, (Jain, S) .

Anthro 177. Environmental Change and Emerging Infectious Diseases

The changing epidemiological environment. How human-induced environmental changes, such as global warming, deforestation and land-use conversion, urbanization, international commerce, and human migration, are altering the ecology of infectious disease transmission, and promoting their re-emergence as a global public health threat. Case studies of malaria, cholera, hantavirus, plague, and HIV.

3-5 units

Anthro 93. Prefield Research Seminar

For Anthropology majors only; non-majors register for 93B. Preparation for anthropological field research in other societies and the U.S. Data collection techniques include participant observation, interviewing, surveys, sampling procedures, life histories, ethnohistory, and the use of documentary materials. Strategies of successful entry into the community, research ethics, interpersonal dynamics, and the reflexive aspects of fieldwork. Prerequisites: two ANTHRO courses or consent of instructor.

5 units, (Coll, K)

Anthro 94. Post Field Seminar

Goal is to produce an ethnographic report based on original field research gathered during summer fieldwork, emphasizing writing and revising as steps in analysis and composition. Students critique classmates' work and revise their own writing in light of others' comments. Ethical issues in fieldwork and ethnographic writing, setting research write-up concerns within broader contexts.

5 units, (Beliso-DeJesus, A)

Biological Sciences

Biosci 102. Demography: Health, Development, Environment

Demographic methods and their application to understanding and projecting changes in human infant, child, and adult mortality and health, fertility, population, sex ratios, and demographic transitions. Progress in human development, capabilities, and freedoms. Relationships between population and environment. Prerequisites: numeracy and basic statistics; Biology or Human Biology core; or consent of instructor.

3 units, (Tuljapurkar, S)

Civil and Environmental Engineering

CEE 165D - Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries

(Same as CEE 265D.) Economic, social, political, and technical aspects of sustainable water supply and sanitation service provision in developing countries. Case studies from Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Service pricing, alternative institutional structures including privatization, and the role of consumer demand and community participation in the planning process. Environmental and public health considerations, and strategies for serving low-income households. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

3 units, Spr (Davis, J

CEE 177S/277S. Design for a Sustainable World

Technology-based problems faced by developing communities worldwide. Student groups partner with organizations abroad to work on concept, feasibility, design, implementation, and evaluation phases of various projects. Past projects include a water and health initiative, a green school design, seismic safety, and medical device. Admission based on written application and interview. See http://esw.stanford.edu for application. (Staff)

1-5 units, ( Bischel, H.; Sundstrom, E.; White, S.; Wood, K)

CEE 227 Global Project Finance

Public and private sources of finance for large, complex, capital-intensive projects in developed and developing countries. Benefits and disadvantages, major participants, risk sharing, and challenges of project finance in emerging markets. Financial, economic, political, cultural, and technological elements that affect project structures, processes, and outcomes. Case studies. Limited enrollment.

3-5 units, (Orr, R.)

CEE 265D. Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries

Economic, social, political, and technical aspects of sustainable water supply and sanitation service provision in developing countries. Case studies from Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Service pricing, alternative institutional structures including privatization, and the role of consumer demand and community participation in the planning process. Environmental and public health considerations, and strategies for serving low-income households. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

3 units, (Davis, J)

Communication

Comm 269. Computers and Interfaces

(Graduate students register for COMM 269.) Interdisciplinary. User responses to interfaces and design implications of those responses. Theories from different disciplines illustrate responses to textual, voice-based, pictorial, metaphoric, conversational, adaptive, agent-based, intelligent, and anthropomorphic interfaces. Group design project applying theory to the design of products or services for developing countries.

4-5 units, (Nass, C).

Cultural and Social Anthropology

Anthro 82, 182. Medical Anthropology

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.

5 units, (Jain, S)

Anthro 131. The Politics of Humanitarianism

Anthropological approaches to contemporary practices of humanitarian intervention. How social theory can inform the politics of humanitarianism, charity, and philanthropy. Focus is on Africa from the colonial era to the present.

5 units, (Malkki, L)

Economics

Econ 106. World Food Economy

The interrelationships among food, populations, resources, and economic development. The role of agricultural and rural development in achieving economic and social progress in low-income nations. Emphasis is on public sector decision making as it relates to food policy.

5 units, (Falcon, W.; Naylor, R.)

Econ 118. Development Economics

The economic problems and policy concerns of developing countries. Theories of growth and development; inequality and poverty; credit and labor markets; health and education; politics and corruption. Emphasis is on economic models and econometric evidence rather than case studies. Prerequisites: 50, 52, 102B.

5 units, (Jayachandran, S)

Education

Educ 202. Introduction to Comparative and International Education

Contemporary theoretical debates about educational change and development, and the international dimension of issues in education. Emphasis is on the development of students' abilities to make cross-national and historical comparisons of educational phenomena. (SSPEP/ICE)

4-5 units, (Adams, J).

Educ 306A. Economics of Education in a Global Economy

Case material considers development problems in the U.S. and abroad. Discussion sections on economic aspects of educational development. (SSPEP/ICE)

5 units, (Carnoy, M.)

Educ 306D. World, Societal, and Educational Change: Comparative Perspectives

Theoretical perspectives and empirical studies on the structural and cultural sources of educational expansion and differentiation, and on the cultural and structural consequences of educational institutionalization. Research topics: education and nation building; education, mobility, and equality; education, international organizations, and world culture.

4-5 units, (Ramirez, F)

Educ 245. Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity

African American, Native American, Mexican American, and Asian American racial and ethnic identity development; the influence of social, political and psychological forces in shaping the experience of people of color in the U.S. The importance of race in relationship to social identity variables including gender, class, and occupational, generational, and regional identifications. Bi- and multiracial identity status, and types of white racial consciousness.

3-5 units, ( Lafromboise, T)

Educ 367. Cultural Psychology

The relationship between culture and psychological processes; how culture becomes an integral part of cognitive, social, and moral development. Both historical and contemporary treatments of cultural psychology, including deficit models, crosscultural psychology, ecological niches, culturally specific versus universal development, sociocultural frameworks, and minority child development. The role of race and power in research on cultural psychology.

3-5 units, (Lafromboise, T)

Ethics in Society

Ethicsoc 133. Ethics and Politics of Public Service

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.

5 units, (Reich, R)

Ethicsoc 171. Justice

Focus is on the ideal of a just society, and the place of liberty and equality in it, in light of contemporary theories of justice and political controversies. Topics include protecting religious liberty, financing schools and elections, regulating markets, assuring access to health care, and providing affirmative action and group rights. Issues of global justice including human rights and global inequality.

4-5 units, (Cohen, J)

Health Research and Policy

HRP 212. Crosscultural Medicine

Developing interviewing and behavioral skills needed to facilitate culturally relevant health care across all population groups. Discussions focus on explicit and implicit cultural influences operating in formal and informal medical contexts.

3 units, (Corso, I)

HRP 231. Infectious Diseases Epidemiology

Principles of the transmission of the infectious agents (viruses, bacteria, rickettsiae, mycoplasma, fungi, and protozoan and helminth parasites). The role of vectors, reservoirs, and environmental factors. Pathogen and host characteristics that determine the spectrum of infection and disease. Endemicity, outbreaks, and epidemics of selected infectious diseases. Principles of control and surveillance.

3 units

History

History 106 A/B. Global Human Geography

A-Asia and Africa
Global patterns of demography, economic and social development, geopolitics, and cultural differentiation, covering E. Asia, S. Asia, S.E. Asia, Central Asia, N. Africa, and sub-Saharan Africa. Use of maps to depict geographical patterns and processes.

5 units, (Lewis, M)

B-Europe and Americas
Patterns of demography, economic and social development, geopolitics, and cultural differentiation. Use of maps to depict geographical patterns and processes.

5 units, (Lewis, M).

History 245E. Health and Society in Africa

The history of disease, therapeutic and diagnostic systems, and the definition of health in precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial Africa. The social and political histories of specific epidemics, including sleeping sickness, influenza, TB, mental illness, and AIDS. The colonial contexts of epidemics and the social consequences of disease.

4-5 units

Human Biology

Humbio 27. Traditional Chinese Medicine

The philosophy and history behind traditional Chinese medicine. Concepts such as Qi, Yin/Yang, meridians, Chinese organs, and the 5 elements. How these concepts are applied through techniques such as acupuncture, herbal medicine, Qi gong, and massage. How traditional Chinese medicine is understood from a scientific standpoint. Political and socioeconomic implications. Observation of an acupuncturist. Readings on the integration of Eastern and Western medicine and on traditional Chinese medicine.

1 unit, (Golianu, B)

Humbio 114. Environmental Change and Emerging Infectious Diseases

(Same as ANTHRO 177, ANTHRO 277.) The changing epidemiological environment. How human-induced environmental changes, such as global warming, deforestation and land-use conversion, urbanization, international commerce, and human migration, are altering the ecology of infectious disease transmission, and promoting their re-emergence as a global public health threat. Case studies of malaria, cholera, hantavirus, plague, and HIV.

3-5 units

Humbio 115B. The Vaccine Revolution

Advanced seminar. Human aspects of viral disease, focusing on recent discoveries in vaccine development and emerging infections. Journal club format: students choose articles from primary scientific literature, write formal summaries, and synthesize them into a literature review. Emphasis is on analysis, experimental design, and interpretation of data. Oral presentations.

6 units

Humbio 115. Humans and Viruses

Introduction to human virology integrating epidemiology, molecular biology, clinical sciences, social sciences, history, and the arts. Emphasis is on host pathogen interactions and policy issues. Topics: polio and vaccination, smallpox and eradication, yellow fever and history, influenza and genomic diversity, rubella and childhood infections, adenovirus and viral morphology, ebola and emerging infection, lassa fever and immune response.

6 units

Humbio 117. Community Health Assessment -Humbio 127A/B

Major determinants of health in a community. Working with community partners to identify health issues and plan programs and policies to prevent disease and promote health. Service learning component involving students in community health assessment techniques. Prerequisite: 4B or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

4 units

Humbio 119. Demography: Health, Development, Environment

Demographic methods and their application to understanding and projecting changes in human infant, child, and adult mortality and health, fertility, population, sex ratios, and demographic transitions. Progress in human development, capabilities, and freedoms. Relationships between population and environment. Prerequisites: numeracy and basic statistics; Biology or Human Biology core; or consent of instructor.

3 units, (Tuljapurkar, S)

HUMBIO 121A. Providing and Evaluating Health Education for Underserved Children

(Same as INDE 262A.) A service learning experience in community health. Students participate in developing health education materials for underserved middle school students based on principles of human biology and health science ; become knowledgeable about logic modes and other evaluation tools available for evaluating health education modules and community intervnetions; develop an implementation and evaluation plan. Prequisite for undergraduates: Human Biology core or equivalent or consent of instructor.

3 units, Aut (Rodriguez, E; Morioka-Douglas, N)

HUMBIO 121B. Providing and Evaluating Health Education for Underserved Children

(Same as INDE 262B.) Students implement the health education activities/modules developed in INDE 262A/HUMBIO 121A, solicit evaluative feedback, and present the outcomes.

3 units, Win (Rodriguez, E; Morioka-Douglas, N)

Humbio 125. Current Topics and Controversies in Women’s Health

Interdisciplinary. Focus is on the U.S. Topics include: health research; bioethical, legal, and policy issues; scientific and cultural perspectives; social influences; environmental and lifestyle effects on health; and issues related to special populations. Guest lecturers; student debates. Prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

3 units, (Stefanick, M)

Humbio 129. Critical Issues in International Women's Health

Women's lives, from childhood through adolescence, reproductive years, and aging. Economic, social, and human rights factors, and the importance of women's capacities to have good health and manage their lives in the face of societal pressures and obstacles. Emphasis is on life or death issues of women's health that depend on their capacity to negotiate or feel empowered, including maternal mortality, violence, HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, and sex trafficking. Organizations addressing these issues. A requirement of this class is participation in public blogs. Prerequisites: Human Biology core or equivalent or consent of instructor.

4 units, (Murray A)

Humbio 129P. International Health Policy: Comparative National Health Care Systems

Identify key dimensions and issues involved in affluent health care systems in countries such as the UK-England, Canada, Germany, Sweden, Japan, and France, including pharmaceutical policy and lessons for U.S. Learn what the key problems are that health care systems face, principal characteristics of several systems, forces of change, and structural differences. How a given country approaches health care takes us to its values, its sense of justice, its views on rationing, its interest groups, and its political power structure.

3 units

Humbio 129S. Global Public Health
Concepts of health and wellness and major descriptors and determinants of health status. International organizations and control programs, disease-related problems within population groups from an epidemiologic viewpoint, health care delivery methods, efforts to improve health through examination of current and previous programs and projects. Cultural, economic, and political contexts in international health.

4 units, (Wise, P)

HUMBIO 153. Parasites and Pestilence: Infectious Public Health Challenges

Parasitic and other pestilence of public health importance. Pathogenesis, clinical syndromes, complex life cycles, and the interplay among environment, vectors, hosts, and reservoirs in historical context. Public health policy initiatives aimed at halting disease transmission. World Health Organization tropical disease targets including river blindness, sleeping sickness, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, mycobacterial disease (tuberculosis and leprosy), malaria, toxoplasmosis, dracunculiais, and intestinal helminthes. Guest lecturers with expertise in disease control. Prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

4 units, Win (Smith, D)

Language Center

Spanish 121M, 122M, 123M. Spanish for Medical Students

Goal is a practical and culturally appropriate command of spoken Spanish. Emphasis is on taking the medical history. Topics include the human body, hospital procedures, diagnostics, food, and essential doctor-patient phrases when dealing with Spanish-speaking patients. Series can be taken independently, depending on the level of prior knowledge.

3 units, (Corso, I)

SpanLang 131M. Spanish for Heritage and Foreign Language Pre-Med and Public Health

For pre-med or public health students who grew up in homes where Spanish is spoken or for students who possess a considerable command of Spanish. Focus is on developing the ability to provide information on health-related topics to Spanish speakers in the U.S. Students participate in the organization and delivery of information on preventive health care in a workshop setting to a Spanish-speaking community.

3-4 units

Miscellaneous

SURG 150 - Global Humanitarian Medicine

Successful international humanitarian service requires multidisciplinary cooperation, professionals from all backgrounds working together toward a common goal: to improve the lives of others. We will give you the skills, knowledge, and contacts to make a difference. Lecturers include global leaders in humanitarian medicine, surgery, and human development. We are looking for a diverse group of individuals interested in an interactive class experience translating to real-world humanitarian action. Students pursuing medicine, engineering, economics, law, arts and humanities, business, education, design and all other disciplines and majors are encouraged to apply!

Complete the short application form here.

4 units

PSYC 81Q - Fate of Orphans and Vulnerable Children in Sub-Saharan Africa: The HIV/AIDS Pandemic

(S,Sem) Stanford Introductory Seminar. The complicated forces,shaped by geopolitcal history and current events, that frame all social programs, the care of orphans in the context of the AIDS pandemic in particular; history of the care of orphans; developmental effects of deprivation of care and nurturing. Guest speakers.

3 units, Win (Solvason, H; Reicherter, D)

AFRICAST 112. AIDS, Literacy, and Land: International Aid and the Problems of Development in Africa

(Same as AFRICAST 212.) Public policy issues, their roots, and the conflicts they engender. The policy making process: who participates, how, why, and with what results? Innovative approaches to contested policy issues. Foreign roles and their consequences. Case studies such as: a clinic in Uganda that addresses AIDS as a family and community problem; and strategies in Tanzania to increase girls' schooling.

5 units, Win (Samoff, J)

Political Science

Polisci 141. The Global Politics of Human Rights

The global development and changing nature of human rights and the rise of an international human rights movement. Conflicts between national sovereignty and rights, and among types of rights. Case studies include genocide in Rwanda, holding torturers accountable in Chile and El Salvador, factory workers versus Nike, and the rights of women in S. Africa.

5 units, (Karl, T)

Public Policy

Publpol 168. Global Organizations: Managing Diversity

Analytical tools derived from the social sciences to analyze global organizations and projects, and applied to the tradeoffs between different designs of teams and organizations. Focus is on tribal mentality and how to design effective organizations and projects for policy implementation within and across institutional settings. Recommended: 102, MS&E 180, or SOC 160.

5 units, (Meyersson Milgrom, E)

Publpol 184. Poverty and Policies in Developing Economies

Economic models of growth and poverty, differences in growth rates among countries, and the persistence of poverty. Models of physical and human capital accumulation, and recent theories of the importance of institutions, social capital, and political factors. The effectiveness of social policies in developing countries, emphasizing India, in the light of theories of growth and poverty, and in terms of immediate goals and long-term consequences. Policies include schooling and health, anti-poverty, banking, and political decentralization. Prerequisites: ECON 1A,B.

5 units, (Kochar, A)

Visit the registrar's website to learn more about the undergraduate courses

Stanford Medicine Resources:

Footer Links: